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Economic Impact of Domestic Violence

Leading facts and statistics on the economic impact of domestic violence.

  • January 07, 2015
  • By domesticshelters.org
Economic Impact of Domestic Violence

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Economic Impact of Domestic Violence
Economic Impact of Domestic Violence

Most of the time domestic violence is discussed in the context of types, incidents, inter-personal dynamics and information on escaping and recovering from violence. Domestic violence also has an enormous economic impact from increased healthcare costs to workplace issues such as safety and productivity.

The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $5.8 billion each year, $4.1 billion of which is for direct medical and mental health services. Source: Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States. 2003. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GA.

When medical care is needed following an assault, the average number of healthcare visits by type of service, if the service is required as a result of the assault, is 21.1 physical therapy visits, 5.7 nights in a hospital, 4.4 dental visits, 3.2 physician visits, 3.1 outpatient visits, 1.9 emergency room visits and 1.1 paramedic visits. Source: National Institute of Justice and the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, “Extent, Nature and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence: Findings from the National Violence Against Women Survey,” (2000).

Victims of intimate partner violence lost almost 8 million days of paid work because of the violence perpetrated against them. This loss is the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs and almost 5.6 million days of household productivity as a result of violence. Source: Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States. 2003. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GA.

Some abusive partners may try to stop women from working by calling them frequently during the day or coming to their place of work unannounced. Research indicates that about 50 percent of battered women who are employed are harassed at work by their abusive partners. Source: U.S. Gen. Accounting Office, GAO/HEHS-99-12, Domestic Violence: Prevalence and Implications for Employment Among Welfare Recipients (1998).

Over three-quarters of offenders used workplace resources at least once to express remorse or anger, check up on, pressure, or threaten the victim; 42% of offenders were late for work. Source: Kim C. Lim et al., Maine Department of Labor and Family Crisis Services, Impact of Domestic Violence Offenders on Occupational Safety & Health: A Pilot Study (2004).

Sixty-four percent (64%) of victims of domestic violence indicated that their ability to work was affected by the violence. Among key causes for their decline in productivity, victims noted "distraction" (57%); "fear of discovery" (45%); "harassment by intimate partner at work (either by phone or in person)" (40%); fear of intimate partner's unexpected visits" (34%); "inability to complete assignments on time" (24%); and "job loss" (21%). Source: Corporate Alliance to End Partner Violence, 2005.